Mardi Gla Parade!

Join Scottish Adoption as we support the LGBTQ+ community and march at this year’s Mardi Gla event in Glasgow!

Join Scottish Adoption as we take to the streets of Glasgow to proudly march with other organisations and groups supporting the LGBTQ+ Community as part of this year’s Mardi Gla. Join us as we take to the streets of Glasgow on Saturday 16th of July starting at 12pm.The route is still to be planned so email david@scottishadoption.org to register your interest to march and we will keep you updated.

2022 marks thirteen years since LGBTQ+ couples have been able to adopt together and it would be great to have many of our families able to join us at these marches celebrating all the LGBTQ+ families Scottish Adoption have helped to create over these last thirteen years and the many more we hope to support in the future! You do not need to be part of the LGBTQ+ community to come march with us, everyone is welcome so bring your family, friends and dogs for a great afternoon out!

The march will be a mix of young and old LGBTQ+ people and will include Politicians from across Scotland mixed with a range of colourful floats and community groups, organisations and businesses alongside members of the public and will highlight the need for fairness and equality across Scotland, the UK and the rest of the world.

If you would like to march with Scottish Adoption families, workers and supporters please do email david@scottishadoption.org to register your interest. Hand made banners will be a bonus!

 

Scottish Adoption Duck Race

The Duck Dash is back for 2022 and will be taking place on Saturday 9th of July!

Duck Race

After a sell out year last year the Duck Dash is BACK for 2022! We are pleased to announce that on the 9th of July 2022 we shall be holding our Duck Dash in North Berwick.

For the second year running we will be holding the Duck Dash out with the City of Edinburgh and holding it at our Family Picnic in North Berwick instead!

There will still be great prizes to win so dig deep and buy your duck here. All ducks will cost £4.00 or buy 3 ducks for £10.

More prizes will be added to this list as and when we get them confirmed. Prizes that have been donated so far include:

  • One of our popular prizes from the last few years have been the Swedish Candles donated by Robert from Woodhead Eco Trees. Robert is back and very generously donated another of his brilliant Swedish Candles.
  • Helen from Rockpool Trading has donated a Kernowspa candle and some Kernow Chocolate. All are handmade in Cornwall from small businesses and are available on their website www.rockpooltrading.co.uk
  • Linda has been a great supporter of our Duck Races and has once again very kindly agreed to make another gorgeous blanket.
  • Maurice has kindly donated a lovely pair of Handmade Stained Glass Earrings and Knecklace. Maurice is currently working on his website but can be contacted on MPG5961@gmail.com
  • Another great supporter of our Duck Race is Andrew from Vino Wines. This year Andrew has donated a lovely Bottle of Fizz from Vino Wines!
  • Brad from GHS Loft Flooring has very kindly donated a loft ladder.
  • Two Bottles of Red Wine have been donated by Angie.
  • Caledonian Horticulture have donated an 8ookg bag of Green Goodness Compost. Don’t worry you wont ned to carry this home, they will deliver!
  • Dynamic Earth in Edinurgh have donated some complimentary passes to the top visitor attraction.
  • Gemma has donated 2 £20 gift vouchers to be used at The Lobster Man at Fenton Barns. Fresh lobster caught off the shores of North Berwick.
  • The Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick have donated a Family Day Pass. You will be able to watch the Gannets on the Bass Rock, watch Puffins on Craigleith Island and try and spot dolphins or seals in the sea. A great day out!
  • Fiona from Business Parcs have donated a great prize for golfers! you coudl win a 4Ball Voucher for Whitehill House Golf Club at Rosewell!
  • Lyndsey from Mini First Aid Edinburgh has donated a voucher for two parents/guardians to come along to an open baby & child first aid class.
  • Lorraine from Bo-peep Handmade has donated one of her gorgeous Bunnies. Lorraine is another supporter who has donated prizes before, and we really appreciate the support!
  • Author Liza Miles has donated signed copies of her books Love Bites, My Life’s Not Funny, and the Cosy Mystery series which is a series of murder mysteries set in Edinburgh.
  • Samantha from Sparkle Craft Creations by Samantha has donated a decorated light up bottle and a decorated stone.
  • Ryze Edinburgh have donated 5 VIP passes! 1 VIP pass is equal to a 60 minute session so you can go 5 times or bring some friends with you!

More prizes will be added to this list and to be in with a chance to win any of these prizes you need to buy a duck, which you can do by clicking here! For more information please call 0131 553 5060 or email david@scottishadoption.org

The Duck Dash is back for 2022 and will be taking place on Saturday 9th of July!

Duck Race

After a sell out year last year the Duck Dash is BACK for 2022! We are pleased to announce that on the 9th of July 2022 we shall be holding our Duck Dash in North Berwick.

For the second year running we will be holding the Duck Dash out with the City of Edinburgh and holding it at our Family Picnic in North Berwick instead!

There will still be great prizes to win so dig deep and buy your duck here. All ducks will cost £4.00 or buy 3 ducks for £10.

More prizes will be added to this list as and when we get them confirmed. Prizes that have been donated so far include:

  • One of our popular prizes from the last few years have been the Swedish Candles donated by Robert from Woodhead Eco Trees. Robert is back and very generously donated another of his brilliant Swedish Candles.
  • Helen from Rockpool Trading has donated a Kernowspa candle and some Kernow Chocolate. All are handmade in Cornwall from small businesses and are available on their website www.rockpooltrading.co.uk
  • Linda has been a great supporter of our Duck Races and has once again very kindly agreed to make another gorgeous blanket.
  • Maurice has kindly donated a lovely pair of Handmade Stained Glass Earrings and Knecklace. Maurice is currently working on his website but can be contacted on MPG5961@gmail.com
  • Another great supporter of our Duck Race is Andrew from Vino Wines. This year Andrew has donated a lovely Bottle of Fizz from Vino Wines!
  • Brad from GHS Loft Flooring has very kindly donated a loft ladder.
  • Two Bottles of Red Wine have been donated by Angie.
  • Caledonian Horticulture have donated an 8ookg bag of Green Goodness Compost. Don’t worry you wont ned to carry this home, they will deliver!
  • Dynamic Earth in Edinurgh have donated some complimentary passes to the top visitor attraction.
  • Gemma has donated 2 £20 gift vouchers to be used at The Lobster Man at Fenton Barns. Fresh lobster caught off the shores of North Berwick.
  • The Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick have donated a Family Day Pass. You will be able to watch the Gannets on the Bass Rock, watch Puffins on Craigleith Island and try and spot dolphins or seals in the sea. A great day out!
  • Fiona from Business Parcs have donated a great prize for golfers! you coudl win a 4Ball Voucher for Whitehill House Golf Club at Rosewell!
  • Lyndsey from Mini First Aid Edinburgh has donated a voucher for two parents/guardians to come along to an open baby & child first aid class.
  • Lorraine from Bo-peep Handmade has donated one of her gorgeous Bunnies. Lorraine is another supporter who has donated prizes before, and we really appreciate the support!
  • Author Liza Miles has donated signed copies of her books Love Bites, My Life’s Not Funny, and the Cosy Mystery series which is a series of murder mysteries set in Edinburgh.
  • Samantha from Sparkle Craft Creations by Samantha has donated a decorated light up bottle and a decorated stone.
  • Ryze Edinburgh have donated 5 VIP passes! 1 VIP pass is equal to a 60 minute session so you can go 5 times or bring some friends with you!

More prizes will be added to this list and to be in with a chance to win any of these prizes you need to buy a duck, which you can do by clicking here! For more information please call 0131 553 5060 or email david@scottishadoption.org

Edinburgh Pride Parade

Join Scottish Adoption as we support the LGBTQ+ community and march at this years Pride Edinburgh Event!

The last time we marched with our families at a Pride event was back in 2019, before the pandemic. We are so excited to be back marching and supporting our LGBTQ+ Families and the wider LGBTQ+ Community at this special 25th Anniversary Pride March in Edinburgh.

Join us as we take to the streets of Edinburgh on Saturday 25th of June starting at 12pm. The route is still to be planned so email david@scottishadoption.org to register your interest to march and we will keep you updated.

2022 marks thirteen years since LGBTQ+ couples have been able to adopt together and it would be great to have many of our families able to join us at these marches celebrating all the LGBTQ+ families Scottish Adoption have helped to create in these last thirteen years and the many more we hope to support in the future! You do not need to be part of the LGBTQ+ community to come march with us, everyone is welcome so bring your family, friends and dogs for a great afternoon out!

The march will be a mix of young and old LGBTQ+ people and will include Politicians from across Scotland mixed with a range of colourful floats and community groups, organisations and businesses alongside members of the public and will highlight the need for fairness and equality across Scotland, the UK and the rest of the world.

If you would like to march with Scottish Adoption families, workers and supporters please do email david@scottishadoption.org to register your interest. Hand made banners will be a bonus!

Scottish Adoption Appoints New Chief Executive

Scottish Adoption has appointed Sue Brunton as Chief Executive with Margaret Moyes stepping down after 14 years leading the adoption charity.

Sue started her new role on Monday 21st of March and couldn’t be more excited to be joining Scottish Adoption “I have long been hugely impressed by the work that Scottish Adoption does, recognising that alongside good solid adoption recruitment, support, therapy and after adoption support, Scottish Adoption have led on really innovative and cutting edge developments such as their work with children and young people and birth parents and promoting LGBTQ+ adoption to name but a few. It’s an honour and a privilege to be appointed to the role.”

Sue worked for Barnardo’s heading up their family placement services across the UK and prior to that looked after their fostering and adoption teams in Scotland. Over her career as a social worker, Sue has spent around 25 years working in services to looked after infants, children and young people and care experienced adults including working with CELCIS and BAAF.

Talking about the future of the agency Sue stated “This is an interesting time to be working in adoption in Scotland, the focus on Care provided by The Promise and the proposals to develop a National Care Service present us with opportunities, although the year on year fall in the numbers of children being placed for adoption also present us with some challenges. The most important thing is that we focus on doing what we do well and I will be taking time to get to know the organisation better to understand the challenges and opportunities we face.” 

Sue also paid tribute to Margaret Moyes who leaves the agency after 14 years of service, “I want to pay tribute to Margaret who is providing me with a robust handover. The organisation is in very good shape thanks to Margaret’s commitment and hard work and I am aware hers are big boots to fill.”

Supporting Our LGBT+ Adopters

The second annual Adoption & Foster care support week for LGBT+ parents takes place 20-24 September. Scottish Adoption is proud to back it.

LGBT+ people now play a key role in Scotland in parenting some of our most vulnerable children. Scottish Adoption have placed more children with LGBT+ families than any other Local Authority and Adoption Agency in Scotland making Scottish Adoption the Number 1 Adoption Agency in Scotland for the LGBT+ Community. Vickie Foster, Practice Manager said

“This is something that Scottish Adoption is extremely proud of, we have worked closely with the LGBT+ community for many years, building up this relationship and trust and will continue to work with to support both the LGBT+ community and our LGBT+ families.”

In 2020 1 in 12 adoptions in Scotland were to same-sex couples. Research suggests that LGBT+ adoptive parents are more likely to adopt older children, sibling groups, or those with additional needs and disabilities than other adopters. While LGBT+ adopters and foster carers bring a unique skillset to parenting, they also face distinct and separate support challenges to other adopters and foster carers.

To help our LGBT+ adopters Scottish Adoption will take part in September’s campaign to raise awareness of new, unique content online that our adopters can access as the campaign takes place. Throughout the week this will focus on education. New Family Social – the UK’s charity for LGBT+ adopters and foster carers – leads the campaign and says education is frequently a concern for them.

“Finding the right school for your child is a top priority for all parents. If you’re LGBT+ you’ll want to make sure your family is fully supported by the school’s policies and practices. You’ll also need to know that the schools on offer can meet your child’s additional needs. If you need to access help from your adoption or fostering agency, you’ll want clarity on what it can do for you,” says James Lawrence, New Family Social’s Head of Engagement & Communications.

Scottish Adoption is a member of New Family Social and offers free access to the charity’s services as part of its support package for its LGBT+ adopters.

Ben’s First Week Reflection

Finding connection in the heart of Leith.

Taking my first steps into the world of Social Work, I was happy to discover that my placement would be with Scottish Adoption. Being a resident of Leith myself, I was excited to find out its office was situated in the heart of the area that I most consider to be home.

Starting my studies back in January at Edinburgh Napier University, I could not have envisioned the surprises that the year ahead would hold. The transition from hands on learning into a world of the virtual required adaptability and resourcefulness that I did not know I was capable of. Being a student on a course that relies so heavily on the human element of supporting and working in partnership with people, Covid would go far in creating barriers to what attracted me most to the course – building connections with individuals and communities.

While I initially considered to have the potential to isolate myself and utilise support from fellow students and the university, this consequently led to a shared resilience and bond that has gone far in strengthening our resolve as students and as people. It is this attitude I hope to take into the real world of social work practice, through my placement opportunity here at Scottish Adoption.

With social distancing meaning that I have had to work from home for most of the year, I was delighted with the prospect of being able to physically come into a working office with real people, doing real social work things. I hoped that I would be entering a work environment that reflected the down to earth, inclusive, and good-humoured attitude that makes Leith so great. I was not disappointed. The people that I have met so far, in person and virtually, have been warmer and more welcoming than I could have hoped for.

The spirit at Scottish Adoption is that the work doesn’t stop no matter what challenges are presented by current complexities in health and social care. The practice that I’ve witnessed so far has left me with a real sense of what drives the work here, this being characterised through means of character building, recognising strengths in individuals, celebrating identity, offering empathy and establishing trust.

It is clear from the little time I have spent here that the shared spirit of community and connection that this organisation radiates will continue to support people through the complexities, frustrations, and uncertainties of these times and I can’t wait to be part of that ethos going forward and ultimately discovering the impact this will have on my development as social work student.

Finding connection in the heart of Leith.

Taking my first steps into the world of Social Work, I was happy to discover that my placement would be with Scottish Adoption. Being a resident of Leith myself, I was excited to find out its office was situated in the heart of the area that I most consider to be home.

Starting my studies back in January at Edinburgh Napier University, I could not have envisioned the surprises that the year ahead would hold. The transition from hands on learning into a world of the virtual required adaptability and resourcefulness that I did not know I was capable of. Being a student on a course that relies so heavily on the human element of supporting and working in partnership with people, Covid would go far in creating barriers to what attracted me most to the course – building connections with individuals and communities.

While I initially considered to have the potential to isolate myself and utilise support from fellow students and the university, this consequently led to a shared resilience and bond that has gone far in strengthening our resolve as students and as people. It is this attitude I hope to take into the real world of social work practice, through my placement opportunity here at Scottish Adoption.

With social distancing meaning that I have had to work from home for most of the year, I was delighted with the prospect of being able to physically come into a working office with real people, doing real social work things. I hoped that I would be entering a work environment that reflected the down to earth, inclusive, and good-humoured attitude that makes Leith so great. I was not disappointed. The people that I have met so far, in person and virtually, have been warmer and more welcoming than I could have hoped for.

The spirit at Scottish Adoption is that the work doesn’t stop no matter what challenges are presented by current complexities in health and social care. The practice that I’ve witnessed so far has left me with a real sense of what drives the work here, this being characterised through means of character building, recognising strengths in individuals, celebrating identity, offering empathy and establishing trust.

It is clear from the little time I have spent here that the shared spirit of community and connection that this organisation radiates will continue to support people through the complexities, frustrations, and uncertainties of these times and I can’t wait to be part of that ethos going forward and ultimately discovering the impact this will have on my development as social work student.

The Log Blog

After 6 months of covid restrictions Mel looks at how she can repair the damage caused by lack of face to face groups.

How do we reverse the impact lockdown has had on vulnerable teenagers?

How do you rebuild 6 months of lost confidence?

How do we get back to face-to-face group work, if face-to-face groups have become a risk assessment code red?

For those of you who are working or living with teenagers who are currently struggling with the social impact of covid, the signs and symptoms will be evident. But for everyone else, it can be hard to imagine what teenagers have to worry about. I mean, we got them back to school right?

Unfortunately for some families, therein lies the problem.  For children who found school, education and friendships hard, or for those who thrived being at home full-time, returning to the (new) normal is the real tough bit.

So, what’s the answer to safely practicing group work and at the same time, restoring our young people’s sense of confidence and connection with others? The answer for the Scottish Adoption Teen Group turned out to be right on our door step.

Thanks to Justus, Jamie and their team at the Leith Croft Carbon College, this autumn term our Young Teen Group will be led through their Mine Croft program. Here, we hope to use fresh air and space as our weapon against covid and use therapeutic outdoor group work to re-sow some of the resilience the pandemic took away.

Positivity aside, first sessions with any newly formed group of teens are daunting.  Nerves and anxiety can play out in all kinds of ways, but mostly this looks a bit like reluctance and non-engagement.  Luckily, the Croft team had the kind of relationship building skills that made it impossible for the teens not to get involved. For example, knowing each of our young people’s names from the moment they arrived, to  projecting a welcoming, calm, but importantly fun vibe. In terms of the activities, show me a teenager who isn’t into axes, hatchets and fire…

Fun”,  “good”, “great” and  “freezing” were some of the words used by our teens at the end checkout to describe their first session. Although it may have been cold, the temperature of the group dynamics was uncharacteristically warm, so a win as far as I’m concerned.

After the group, I (a naturally reluctant reflector) thought about how the Croft might have changed some things for me too. As I watched one of our teens balancing on a log, flailing around and shouting, I found myself encouraging them to keep on going and praising their skill. In that moment, I realised, had this taken place in the old world, with the group in the office, the balancing would have been on a chair, or on my desk. I would not have cheered them on, or boosted their confidence. I would not have laughed. My face would have twitched and I would have promptly told them to GET DOWN. The natural space makes you view behaviour differently. What inside is difficult to manage, outside can become positive risk based play.

So the Croft might just be the answers to a lot of our new world problems. Restoring connections, enhancing confidence, building resilience, beating Covid and… my twitchy face!

The answer: #getgroupsoutdoors 

Becoming Us

Does online group work really work?

During deep lockdown, I asked myself this question every single time I logged onto zoom to hold an adoption teen group.

Today, looking at our group, reunited for the first time in person since February, I’m thinking, yes it does!

This evening, we’re celebrating the end of last years group with a trip to Foxlake. Coming together one last time before we welcome our new recruits and saying goodbye to Sarah (appointed 2nd most embarrassing group facilitator) as she moves onto pastures new.

The last time these young people came together in person, in February, the group did not quite feel like a group. It still feels like 6 individual young people, only half aware of their common connection (an adoption experience) and group identity.

But this time it felt different, because today I saw…

  • Good Communication – relaxed chatting and genuine interest in one another.
  • Empathy – helping and supporting each other physically and emotionally get through the challenges of the rope course.
  • Connection – eye contact, nudging, pairing up and shared jokes.
  • Group identity – remembering “old times” together and acknowledging that “our group” will change soon and that there will be both benefits and challenges to that.

Online group work is not without its challenges. It can feel like an emotional vacuum. Screens freeze, people literally disappear in front of your eyes and there’s a very good chance that the kids will know their way around the technology better than you!

But, for this group, it did work. It helped promote all off the above and we continued to build relationships and friendships and then, we became an “us”.

To Sarah who we will miss a lot.

A Study Into Adoption

Chloe opens up about problems she faced in school soon after she was adopted.

My first problems in school started soon after my adoption.  I eagerly told all my classmates that I was adopted. I think because I didn’t want it to come out as the big surprise.

To me, adoption seemed like a fresh start, where people didn’t judge me for my family and the things they’d done.

However, as I had a sibling, this meant that everyone now knew my brothers story. He wasn’t pleased. He wanted to be the normal kid, living the normal life.

Many adopted young people have to move school after their adoption. For me, this was also the case and it was tough. In those first few weeks, I followed the customs of my old school, where we were asked to sit cross-legged and to raise our index finger onto our lips when we wanted to talk. When I did this at my new school, they thought I was weird and old fashioned.

Another school issue I faced was the gaps in my learning. Before my adoption, I didn’t go to school all the time and as a result of that, my math’s was dreadful. Many, “normal” people have trouble with maths or English, but I truly struggle. People have told me I probably missed the bits at the start, so my whole foundation to learn math’s was actually missing.

To try fix it, I had to spent my summers catching up on what I missed, and to this day my addition and subtraction is not up to scratch. Finding something so simple as primary school math’s difficult was a really embarrassing for me and I feel it’s the reason I have some insecurities and it hurts if I’m called a name like “stupid”.

Lastly, I feel the social element of school also affected me. Bullying and care-related name calling has left me feeling very insecure about how people see me and how they think of me.

To manage this, I’ve spent some time speaking to Scottish Adoption about how I think about myself and others.

For any adoptive parents out there, a fairly easy way to help your  child through this school stuff is to listen and listen well. Sometimes we, as adoptees, feel like we aren’t heard.

I also believe that most adopted children will need more support to get through school, so be ready!

Chloe, Aged 17, Scottish Adoption Teen Ambassador

I See Me

“Now, when I feel negative about my past, I remind myself that only I  have the power to change my identity. . I see Me!”

Are you still trying to figure out who you are or have you already found yourself?

If the latter, congratulations! However, for those of you who are still finding yourselves, here are some things from my journey that I would like to share with you.

For me growing up, when adoption was spoken about at  school, if mentioned at all, it often came from playground insults. I heard a lot of “lol, your birth parents didn’t want you” or “Is your life like Tracey Beaker?”

I’m sure for those of you who have been pointed at and insulted, you experienced the same thing as I did when this happened. It affected my confidence and how I viewed myself.

For a long time, I took these insults.  However, within the past year, I decided, no longer! The last time I was insulted I replied with the following “No my life is nothing life Tracey Beaker and why I was adopted is none of your business”.

Back in my birth town, everyone knew me and my family as a problem family that needed to be taken care of. This impacted too on how I saw myself.

Throughout my adoption journey, there have also been a variety of feelings that have troubled me. For example, a sense of abandonment, confidence issues and a lack of control. These feelings have come from both my experiences and from how others perceive adoption as a whole.

With both, the result has meant that we as adoptees often end up feeling that how we feel on the inside, is how others think about us.

The good news is, things are getting better. Growing in age, leaving the toxic environment of school and realising that through things like work, I know have confidence that I can control my own future.

Now, when I feel negative about my past, I remind myself that only I  have the power to change my identity. . I see Me!

Chloe, aged 17, Scottish Adoption Teen Ambassador